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Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

Twitter for job listing? It appears so.

newspapers

While it seems impossible to give a job description in 144 characters, there are plenty of companies who are giving enough information for job seekers to click.

Employers in almost every  field are using Twitter to list jobs. One can look for a job locally, twitter.com/#!/jobsraleigh, by field, twitter.com/#!/getsalmanagjobs  or by company, twitter.com/#!/electra.

In fact, in an  interview  Zappos  Recruiting Manager, Christa Foley, said not only does Zappos list jobs on Twitter, they do a search looking for people tweeting about their interest in working for Zappos.

She said primarily using Twitter seems to lead to higher quality applicants, who have done their homework, knows what job they want and are actively pursuing it.

Twitter Basics:

  • You don’t have to have an account to read what others are tweeting. Go to twitter.com and put anything in the search field, say, Holy Cow Branding, our tweets will come up
  • You do need an account if you want to tweet or follow others
  • ‘Follow’ means you want to see all the tweets from a person or organization
  • Accounts are free and it takes just a minute to sign up
  • Twitter is just another way to get your brand to the world, it doesn’t stand alone but it can nicely compliment the rest of your marketing efforts, or job recruiting.
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Twitter bird yellingAccording to Urban Dictionary, being “tweetable” means that something is worthy of being written about on Twitter. It may be good or bad – it applies to anything worth a tweet.

What’s even better than being tweetable? Why being retweetable, of course! Being retweetable means that someone else felt your information was valuable enough to pass it along to their followers, too.

On Twitter, you only have 140 characters to get your message out there, and make it noticed. It is important you’re thinking like your followers (who should include your clients and prospects) and using catchy verbiage through a somewhat conversational tone to strike their interest. Start your tweets with a clever pun, quote, or phrase that will make a person look twice at your tweet. Then, continue your update with what you’re promoting toward the end. The better the quality of the information you provide, the more likely your followers will retweet it.

Quick Tips for being Retweetable

  • People love infographics
  • Don’t just talk about yourself (booorrrring)
  • Share things you think are interesting (chances are, others will find it interesting, too)
  • Retweet quality tweets from others, they’ll pay more attention to what you say, too

Now that you’re fully armed, we hope you’ll be tweeting like pros!

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Control KeyA mission critical strategy for your website is ensuring that it has fresh content to keeps visitors coming back.

A static site, while it can perform several basic functions, doesn’t provide your brand with the “stickiness” it deserves, and it certainly doesn’t give the appearance that you’re actively involved in it’s upkeep. Take charge of your website. Allocate time and resources to its maintenance, and, if your new content is worthy, you’ll find that it breeds brand loyalty by bringing ­visitors back for more and more. A dynamic site can also grow your market. For example, fresh content infused with the right keywords can help you stay abreast of current search trends.

Staying on top of your site isn’t as much work as you might think. Here are a few steps you can follow to take charge of your online brand:

1.  Invest in a Content Management System

It’s no secret that few small business owners have the time or know-how to fiddle with backend web development. So, ask your developer about implementing a content management system that allows you to easily update your site’s content without fear of messing up the code. It may seem like an extraneous cost up front, but if you’re serious about keeping your site (and its visitors) up to date, the initial dollar amount pales in comparison to the fees you’ll incur when the bills for all those update requests pop up in the mail.

2. Upload News Items on a Regular Basis

     Whether your site contains a media room or a press release archive, it’s important that visitors don’t have to go off-site to find out your business’s business. An updated list of news items on your site shows that your business is active and making headlines. Just make sure your news is newsworthy.

3.  Add a Twitter Feed

     If your business is on Twitter, you could provide your website visitors with a link that allows them to follow you. Better yet, you could add a Twitter feed to your site and give them a taste of all the benefits they have to gain from following you.

4.  Incorporate a Blog

     The benefits of a blog are too numerous to cover in full here. In short, if you aren’t blogging, you probably should be. Blogs help position you as an expert in your field by allowing you to share your unique knowledge in a forum that can educate and inspire discussion among peers and prospects. As such, blogs are public sources of knowledge that consistently add fresh content, and can help position your site for optimal search rankings… if it’s within your domain. Make sure you aren’t taking the easy way out and sending visitors to a blog with a separate domain name. Go the extra mile and have your blog incorporated into your site.

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For years, advertisers have operated under the fundamental assumption that consumers are stupid. It sounds bad, I know, but consider the practice of traditional advertising: you flash evocative images in front of viewers in an attempt to subliminally influence their purchasing habits by informing them that they are currently inadequate, and the only means of overcoming their inadequacy is to obtain a very specific product or service – the product or service you happen to be selling. It’s not exactly giving them the benefit of the doubt, is it?

Ah, the sixties

Self-made sixties ad executive Don Draper, protagonist of the popular show Mad Men, and all around not very moral guy, once explained the practice of advertising to a client like this: “It’s based on one thing: happiness. And do you know what happiness is? Happiness is the smell of a new car. It’s freedom from fear. It’s a billboard on the side of a road that screams with reassurance that whatever you’re doing is OK. You are OK.” This definition, though uttered by a fictional quasi-caricature of callous corporate decision-makers, speaks volumes about the way advertisers have traditionally seen consumers; namely, that they just aren’t smart enough to overcome their basest emotions – their fears and desires – and realize that they’re being totally sold; that consumers are somehow incapable of transcending the commercial experience and recognizing that, above it all, there’s a puppet master somewhere, pulling the strings, trying to influence them for less than altruistic reasons. In the sixties, consumers were considered tabula rasa; lesser entities ad men could uninhibitedly impose their will upon through the power of visual and verbal suggestion. But this is 2010. Why does any of that matter? Advertisers don’t think like that anymore, right? Wrong.

Watch TV without a DVR for an hour or so (a daunting task, I know) and you’re sure to see any number of those tired, unentertaining, run-of-the-mill, market-to-the-gut, disingenuous, old-style ads paraded innocently on screen as if you didn’t know that what you were seeing was a paid promotional piece – as if you aren’t able to discern that the people behind the curtain are trying to make you give them your money, and not just offering you unbiased reassurance or friendly advice on how to better yourself. I don’t know about you, but I find it downright insulting. I also find it exasperating – that experience of being forced into viewing a commercial as something genuine. The only time I want to engage in willing suspension of disbelief nowadays is during things I enjoy – things that actually offer some reward for my strenuous self-delusion… like sci-fi TV shows.

Turmoil

Now, before you write me off as a total cynic, let me say that I realize there are many companies out there that believe wholeheartedly in the product and/or service they’re advertising, and even some that advertise truthfully. Unfortunately, that no longer matters like it used to. Why? Because most Americans are no longer willing to believe that this is the case with any company. All it takes is a few corporate bad apples to ruin the whole bunch, and America has seen more than a few in the last several decades. Whether it’s companies that advertise environmental friendliness and then dump millions of gallons of oil into the sea (I won’t mention any names), or companies that brag about outstanding customer service to cable customers and then force them to spend seven hours on the phone, never fix their ESPNHD channel, and still bill them twice the amount they owe (again, no names, though that last one may or may not have happened to me last month… just sayin’), American consumers have all had their share of bad experiences, and have every right to their trust issues. With this in mind, doesn’t it seem like kind of a bad idea to continue advertising as though consumers are still as easily influenced as they were when skinny ties and lunchtime martinis were the norm? I’ll answer that for you: yes. Yes it does seem like a bad idea, because it is.

But don’t worry, not all contemporary ads are informed by the colossal misconception that every American consumer is a complete ninny. Somewhere along the line, (some) ad firms realized that maybe a few people were smart enough to see behind the facade a bit, and decided that instead of trying to advertise on the paper-thin pretense that the companies they represent actually have the best interest of consumers in mind, they’d just try to entertain. This enlightening idea gave birth to what we all know now as the popular “funny advertisement.” And some funny ads, regardless of their effectiveness, actually make ten-minute commercial breaks a bit more bearable. But, apparently, effectiveness is kind of important to most companies, and, seriously, no matter how many times I laugh at a Geico commercial (or used to – they’ve been pretty blah lately), I still can’t make myself believe they’re as legit as say, State Farm.

So where does that leave us? I’ll tell you where: in a giant whirlpooling mire of outdated, ineffective, confused, and overused advertising clichés, where the only prevailing philosophy is “bludgeon them over the head with your name enough times and they’ll eventually become so delirious that they break down and buy things from you.”

And then there’s Old Spice™.

To be fair, there are several other companies that advertise well, but Old Spice is a shining paragon of what I’m going to call the New Advertising, because I’m tired of thinking up clever names for things. Seriously, I do it every day. It gets old. Anyway, watch this commercial and tell me it isn’t awesome. I dare you.

This ad, featuring actor Isaiah Mustafa and his chiseled abs, is absolutely great. It’s funny, but it isn’t its absurdist comedy in and of itself that makes it so effective. It’s effective because at its root, beyond all the ridiculousness and faux-machismo, it’s a ruthless parody of old-school advertisements for similar products – advertisements like this:

Or like this:

Yikes. These are funny, but mostly because they’re so corny. Believe it or not, some still adhere to the basic concepts behind this style of advertising.

Consider that Old Spice used to advertise in a similar fashion, and, as a result, was regarded as deodorant for your grandpa. It might be hard to imagine now, but seven years ago, I wouldn’t have used Old Spice if you paid me. It was just… too old. Now, by spoofing exactly what they themselves used to be and how they used to market, the company has totally repositioned their brand, moving it right to the head of the 20-30 year-old male market, without, I’d be willing to bet, alienating older consumers, who, let’s face it, are too set in their ways deodorant-wise to make a switch now.

But there’s another, far more important reason that spoofs in the style of the Old Spice Isaiah Mustafa commercials are better than current run-of-the-mill funny ads. See, ads that successfully parody old advertising clichés actually acknowledge that viewers aren’t blind to the fact that they’re being marketed to. By pointing out how ridiculous and transparent old advertising practices were, ad firms are essentially deferring to the intellect of viewing consumers. In so many words, what Old Spice is saying here is this: “We know you’re savvy, and we know there’s relatively no difference between our product and someone else’s. We also know that you, in all likelihood, are aware of that fact. That’s why we don’t bother to try and beat you over the head with questionable data that you probably won’t believe about why our product is supposedly superior to someone else’s. We treat you like an equal with our ads, and we interact with you under the assumption that you are just as wise to advertising tricks as we are. So if you support our company, you show the world that you are a savvy consumer and an intelligent member of society that scoffs at outdated advertisements and can’t be hoodwinked by their ilk.”

Parodic ads boost consumers one step up on the evolutionary chain of advertising by crediting them with the awareness level of the advertisers themselves, and consumers, if not always consciously, appreciate that, as well as the collateral entertainment. Everyone likes to be in on a joke.

Which is why Old Spice didn’t stop at static TV ads. After the initial success of the commercials, in which a half-naked Mustafa progresses through a rapidly changing series of constructed film sets (another nod toward the artifice of TV advertising) depicting impossibly manly scenarios, Old Spice decided to get interactive. A team of marketers and videographers crammed into a studio for a solid day and filmed Mustafa in real-time, garbed in his signature bath-towel, responding to comments from high profile twitter users, like Ashton Kutcher and Perez Hilton, in typical ridiculous macho man fashion. The videos were immediately posted to Old Spice’s Youtube channel, which allows for user comments and interactions, where they quickly received hundreds of thousands of hits. It was beautiful.

On every level, Old Spice included their viewers in the advertising experience. They invited consumers to laugh with them at the silliness of old-school advertising. They encouraged their feedback. They even let them shape the course of ads by responding directly to their tweets. And by doing so, they completely sold them.

Yep, when I said ads that successfully spoof old-school advertising move consumers up a notch, I was telling the truth. I just neglected to mention that they also move advertisers further up – right to where they’re always striving to be: one step ahead. That’s why I think The New Advertising is an appropriate – albeit kind of uninspired – name for what Old Spice and similar companies are doing now. It’s the next step on the evolutionary chain, progressing the whole paradigm, putting advertisers back where they need to be in order to effectively drive sales. It’s like the 60’s all over again… except less hallucinogens and free love. Though I hear skinny ties are making a comeback.

The Man

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I recently had lunch with some old friends. After a long period of “remember whens” we started talking about what we do at our jobs. I started listing some of the things I do on a daily basis; I update the company blog, check e-mails, research on Twitter,  and maintain Facebook pages for clients…

While I was listing, my friend Tim stopped me mid-sentence and asked, “what’s this whole ‘Twitter” thing about?”

As a Gen Y’er, we always want to stay connected. It’s who we are. Gen Y’ers grew up with the internet and cell phones attached to us. I know if I don’t have my cell phone, which has my entire life in it, I’m lost. I know if I don’t check my email and all the social networking sites I belong to, I am probably out of the loop with all my friends. And if I don’t check my Twitter account, I won’t know what is going on within the advertising community, around the world, or even locally.

So how was I going to explain Twitter to a guy who doesn’t really get the Social Networking frezny? “It’s like a Super Target®,” I explained. It’s like going to the grocery store and the mall at the same time; it’s a one-stop shop! When you sign onto Twitter you’re signing onto multiple sources of information, for example

  • If I want to know what my friends are doing at work, Twitter tells me.

 

  • If I want to know what’s going on across the globe, CNN Twitter will keep me up to speed.

 

  • If I can’t remember what Ellen Degeneres is doing on her show that day, I can find it on Twitter.

 

  • If I am a store owner and I want to let my followers know about an upcoming sale, I can Tweet about it.

 

  • If I want to send President Obama a message about Bo, the new first dog, TWITTER LETS ME!

“Twitter is not so much about connecting with your friends, it’s about broadcasting information.” Stan Schroeder explained in an article on Mashable, The Social Networking Guide. It is the ultimate way to connect with companies, organizations and people, while filtering out tweets that are not relevant to you.

As PR, Advertising and Marketing, professionals we can use Twitter as an important tool in our every day work. PR practitioners are now using Twitter as a crisis mangament tool. Using Twitter during a crisis keeps readers updated in real time while using Twitpics to show live footage of a situation as it is happening. One example where we saw Twitter used during a crisis, was when Scott Monty of Ford Motor Company openly “tweeted” about a situation that developed when a Ford Fan Web site announced to the public that Ford was attacking their site. Through a series of Tweets, Monty kept followers of his Twitter account up-to-date. He even asked followers to “retweet” the messages that he posted so that he could reach more of the public. By keeping the Ford Followers on Twitter in touch with what was going on during the crisis, the Ford Motor Company was letting the public know that they care about the situation and want to find a solution to the problem.

 Ad agencies are also taking advantage of this fast moving technology by developing focus groups on Twitter. Tweeters can quickly let the public know their opinions of brands, products and services, and companies can quickly search them based on key words/phrases.  According to an Article on AdAge by Lee Mikles, “Twitter has been a great tool for us to monitor buzz about products or campaigns for our clients.”

 As I explained all of this to my friend, I told him that social networking sites are more than just keeping connected with friends and family. You can know what’s going on at the White House or even with Ashton Kutcher. It’s a one-stop-shop. It’s like when I go to Super Target®, I can get my groceries, household items and the lastest fashion trends all at the same place! For PR, Advertising and Marketing practitioners, social media give us the opportunity to quickly learn about our markets. We have the chance to stay connected with the public, keep up-to-date with current events, gain insight on industry trends and learn more about people’s likes and dislikes. We are being supplied with all the information we could ever ask for. We just need to make sure we use it.

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One of our recent blog entries gave tips on how to market your business when the economy is slow. One of the items on the list said to maximize your use of social media. So what does that mean exactly?

Last week I took our own advice and attended a social media seminar hosted by the Triangle Interactive Marketing Association (TIMA). The guest speaker was Peter Shankman, founder and CEO of The Geek Factory, Inc. Shankman is known worldwide for his fun and different ways of using social media and marketing. I really appreciated the fact that right off the bat he said that he was not going to tell us how to be a social media expert. Instead, he was straight forward, humorous and used real life examples to enlighten us on the current social media setting. To practice what Shankman preaches, I wanted to pass along some key points that I took out of the seminar for others to share.

  • If you post a video on YouTube, have you created a viral campaign for your client? NO. Simply posting something doesn’t make it viral. That is why it is important to use strategy to come up with a creative message, the right people to target your message to and the right places to put your message so those people see it and pass it along. It also doesn’t hurt if you make it interesting or bizarre. An example of this would be the Diet Coke and Mentos eruption. The experiment was done on a news show in 2005, by Steve Spangler, and then took off on the Internet. Only when people are talking about your message and passing it along to others can your message become viral. This also reminds me of a video that was emailed to me a long time ago by a friend. It was a guy dancing to different songs throughout the years. It was titled, The Evolution of Dance. This video ended up getting a lot of attention because so many of us talked about it and passed it along.
  • If you are on many of the social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter and Linked In, and have many friends on those sites, it means you are using social media sites effectively, right? WRONG. I love this point because Shankman really got the audience involved on this one. At one point while he was speaking he asked the audience, “How many of you have over 1000 friends on Facebook?” I saw about 5-10 hands go up. One of which was from a young woman sitting near me. She was smiling and confident about those 1000 friends. Then Shankman asked, “Ok those of you who raised your hands, out of the 1000 people, how many of them have written on your wall to wish you a Happy Birthday?” The girl next to me started counting out loud and thinking real hard about it. I heard the number 12 come out of her mouth. Then Shankman said, “I bet those of you who raised their hands are suddenly realizing that it was only about 1-5% of those 1000 people.” What is important is not how many networks you are on or how many friends you have, but are you using the sites effectively. So whether you are on the sites or not, you must interact with people. Congratulate them, say hi or offer to take someone out to lunch because it’s all about the interaction.
  • Lastly, we all need to utilize the Raving Fans. Raving Fans is a book by Ken Blanchard & Sheldon Bowles, about how a company should convert satisfied customers into raving fans that promote their business. Any company that has a customer who is pleased with their product needs to capitalize on that. That customer has other friends who may need the product and if they are raving about you they may tell those friends. So have places for customers to voice their opinions about your product. Whether it is on a social network or your website, let them give their review. When a person speaks highly of your product, give him or her something back. Give coupons, gift certificates, free t-shirts or branded items with a personalized note. This will have your fans thinking your company or product is even more wonderful and will help them promote you further.

Jim Tobin, of Ignite Social Media, calls social networking a Virtual Cocktail Party. You need to mingle and connect with those people you don’t know and start a relationship. For those people who you have existing relationships with, you need to see how they are doing, meet with them and maintain that connection. Social media is not a competition to see who has the most friends… it’s a means for building and maintaining relationships. If you are in it for the long haul then social media is for you. If you are a commitment phobe then maybe you should rethink your use of social media.

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I have done it. I’m almost a full-blown geek. I can now be found on linkedin, plaxo, facebook and twitter.

Twitter is my latest foray into the world of social media. I haven’t fully gotten the grasp on it, but what I’ve seen so far is pretty cool.

It amazes me that people have gone from feeling disconnected because of technology to being connected in such a way that your friends, family & followers can keep up with what you have going on as quickly as you can throw a post up on the web. How awesome is that?

Have you taken the time to get connected? Do you find it effects your perception of the internet?

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